How To Grow Mountain Alyssum – Mountain Alyssum Care And Growing Conditions


By: Amy Grant

If you are looking for an evergreen perennial ground cover, look no further than the mountain alyssum plant (Alyssum montanum). So what is mountain alyssum? Keep reading to find out more about this interesting plant.

What is Mountain Alyssum?

This little flowering beauty is hardy in USDA zones 3-9, drought-tolerant once established, and excellent cover for rock gardens and other niches that are more difficult to plant. Growing mountain alyssum is a low ground cover only reaching 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 cm.) in height with a 12- to 20-inch (30.5 to 51 cm.) spread.

The evergreen foliage of grey-green color sports plentiful, little, yellow flowers in late spring through the early summer. Rapidly growing mountain alyssum plants will soon fill in rocky borders or alpine landscapes with a riot of yellow blooms so prolific the foliage can barely be seen.

How to Grow Mountain Alyssum

The answer to, “How to grow mountain alyssum?” is a short one as mountain alyssum care is easy as can be. An undemanding specimen, mountain alyssum will grow and flourish in almost any soil type, from loamy to sandy, with either an alkaline to neutral to acidic pH. It prefers well-draining soil and full sun exposure, although it will tolerate light shade.

Mountain alyssum plants can be grown from seed and, in fact, will self-seed if allowed to do so. It is much quicker to purchase seedlings from your local nursery where they may also be found under the names ‘Mountain Gold Madwort’ or just ‘Mountain Madwort.’

Plant the mountain alyssum spaced 10 to 20 inches (25.5 to 51 cm.) apart in a rock garden, border, or even as a container specimen with other alpine plants. After the second or third growth season, the plants may be divided in the early fall.

Mountain Alyssum Care

Caring for mountain alyssum plants is as easy as planting them. As mentioned previously, this plant is not fussy about water and indeed has a certain amount of drought tolerance.

Clip the tops and remove fading blooms to encourage a bushy habit.

Mountain alyssum is fairly resistant to both pests and diseases although it is susceptible to aphids and root rot.

This native of the Mediterranean is an ideal addition to any rocky landscape and will provide a riot of golden spring color with minimum care.

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Alyssum, Alpine Alyssum, Madwort, Mountain Alyssum 'Golden Spring'

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Alyssum (al-ISS-um) (Info)
Species: wulfenianum (wulf-en-ee-AY-num) (Info)
Cultivar: Golden Spring
Additional cultivar information:(PP25710)
Hybridized by Thorup
Registered or introduced: 2013

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

This plant is resistant to deer

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed sow indoors before last frost

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

On Jul 14, 2016, RosinaBloom from Waihi,
New Zealand (Zone 1) wrote:

Also known as Madwort, this mild winter hardy alyssum forms a low, trailing mound or cushion of grey-green leaves, bearing masses of golden yellow flowers in mid to late spring. Trimming back after blooming maintains a bushy habit. It is frost and freeze tolerant, can take the heat, is deer and rabbit resistant, and drought tolerant once established. It is easy to grow, and comes back year after year. Needs the sun.


ALYSSUM BASICS

Zones:

Annual up to Zone 8 short-lived perennial in Zones 9-11.

Height/Spread:

Sprawling or mounding habit, with plants growing 4-10 inches tall, 10-48 inches wide, with branches trailing up to 36 inches long.

Exposure:

Sweet alyssum blooms best with at least six hours of full sun, but can tolerate partial shade. In warmer climates, plants perform best with protection from hot afternoon sun.

Bloom time:

Spring until the first hard frost.

Color and characteristics:

Plants have tiny, hairy, oval leaves that are green, blue-green, or variegated. Branching stems bear prolific clusters of 1/4-inch wide four-petaled blossoms. The delightful honey-scented flowers come in shades of white, pink, rose, lavender, purple and apricot.

Types:

Older varieties (Lobularia maritima) are easily grown from seed and self-sow readily from year to year in temperate climates. Referred to as cool-season annuals, they are much more cold hardy than the newer hybrids, as well as being more drought tolerant. They bloom best in spring and fall, with a lull during hot summer months. A newer generation (Lobularia hybrids )—developed for extreme vigor and bigger plant size—bloom nonstop throughout the growing season. These varieties take the heat much better than L. maritima types, but are not drought tolerant. They are sterile (not seed-producing), so are only grown from cuttings.

Toxicity:


Mountain Alyssum

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

This plant is resistant to deer

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 °C (-40 °F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 °C (-35 °F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Feb 13, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

An alpine that does not like hot humid summers where the night temperature often remains above 70F, as in the southeastern US south of Z6/7.

Blooms for an exceptionally long time, into early summer here.

On Nov 11, 2008, altagardener from Calgary, AB (Zone 3b) wrote:

An evergreen ground cover that is native to the southeastern Alps. Ranges from completely prostrate to about 5 inches high, with bright yellow mustard-like blooms on long brittle stems. Blooms throughout the season, from extremely early to extremely late. Extremely hardy, perennial down to at least zone 3 can be relatively short-lived (though self-seeding), with individual plants lasting 2 to 10 years.


Alyssum is a moisture-loving plant, so it loves consistent watering. Water regularly so that soil is moist but not soggy. Adding a two-inch layer of organic mulch around plants will help retain moisture and maintain an even distribution of water to the plant. As much as alyssum loves to be sufficiently hydrated, it is also a drought-tolerant plant, which is somewhat forgiving of some neglect.

Alyssum is relatively hardy and does not require fertilizer, particularly when planted in the ground. However, these plants are heavy feeders, and because they thrive through multiple seasons, they can benefit from a time-released organic fertilizer to keep them happy throughout the growing season.


Information On Mountain Alyssum Plants: Caring For Mountain Alyssum - garden

Alyssum plants are a tender and delicate annual. They are small and easy to grow. Alyssum are usually used as a border plant and also look really good growing in the nooks and crannies of a rock garden. They are good candidates for container gardens, too. More on Rock Gardens.

Alyssum are small plants, growing just three to nine inches tall, depending upon variety. Dainty Alyssum plants have a profusion of flowers, with white being the most popular. Flower varieties also include: pink, violet, purple and lavender.

Most Popular Varieties: Carpet of Snow, Mountain Gold

Alyssum are grown from seed. Sow Alyssum seeds directly into your flower garden. You can also start seeds indoors for transplanting later. If planting outdoors, sow Alyssum seeds after the soil has begun to warm in the spring. Alyssum do not like frost, so if started indoors, transplant them outdoors after the last frost date.

Space plants eight to ten inches apart.

Sow seeds early in the season and cover lightly with soil. Water thoroughly once. Alyssum will begin to produce a continuous profusion of sweet smelling flowers by mid-summer.

How to Grow Alyssum Flower Plants:

Alyssum like full to partial sun. They will do well in average soils and tolerate dry soil conditions. Water them during dry periods, once or twice per week. Soil should drain well. Add a general purpose fertilizer once a month.

Once your Alyssum are established, they will grow well until the first frost. Alyssum are tender annuals and highly susceptible to frost.

Flowers Bloom: Spring to early summer

Alyssum are somewhat resistant to insects and disease. If insect or disease problems occur, treat early with organic or chemical insect repellents and fungicide.


How to Grow Sweet Alyssum From Seed

You can start sweet alyssum from seed or plant, both of which are widely available at nurseries (though some new cultivars are not available as seeds). To start from seed, simply scatter the seeds atop the soil and press them down lightly so they make good contact with the dirt but are still exposed to light. Keep the soil moist until germination, then water whenever the soil feels dry.

You can direct seed outdoors once the soil feels warm to the touch or start alyssum seed indoors about eight weeks before your last frost date (do not transplant until after all danger of frost). Alyssum is somewhat frost-tolerant once established, but tender transplants are not hardy enough for frost.


Watch the video: Lobularia curgător - prezentare


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